Judaic Fiber Art Gallery

 

The Journey Quilt

Wallhanging to commemorate the synagogue renovation. Hand-dyed, batik, and commercial cotton and polyester fabrics; cotton threads; cotton batting and backing; fabric markers; machine piecing and free-motion quilting. The Star of David design comes from a back issue of Quilter’s Newsletter.

Michael & Mia’s Chuppah

Made for my son and daughter-in-law’s 2015 wedding.  The dark gold ring is embroidered with Mia and Michael’s Hebrew names and their wedding date. The light gold ring is embroidered with a poem by Yehuda Halevi, a medieval Spanish philosopher and poet: “Ever since you were the home of love for me, my love has lived where you have lived,” which I selected because it reminded me of the couple’s song, “Home,” by Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros.  The border depicts the seven biblical species, sacred fruits and grains which are grown in the land of Israel: wheat, barley, grapes, figs, pomegranates, olives and dates.  The harvest of each of these fruits and grains occurs at different times throughout the year, promising a continuous cycle of abundance.  Perched among the dates are two doves, symbols of possibility, harmony, and love.  The three other species represent Vermont, the social place Mia and Michael met and married: the Hermit Thrasher, Red Clover, and the Sugar Maple are the state bird, flower, and tree.  Exhibited in Sacred Threads, 2017.  Featured in Sacred Threads catalog.

Michael & Mia’s Seven Species Chuppah Quilt

This companion piece was created because where on earth would they be able to display that big chuppah in the tiny New York apartment?  I used many of the same fabrics in this smaller version, but created it using traditional Baltimore Album quilt techniques, inspired by Elly Sienkiewicz.  Exhibited in Sacred Threads, 2017.  Featured in Sacred Threads catalog.

Torah Mantles

Silk dupioni; hand-dyed cotton thread; cotton batting and backing; machine free-motion quilting. Collection of Temple Emanuel, Kensington, Maryland.

Matzah Cover

Commercial cotton fabrics and cotton and perle cotton threads; cotton batting and backing; free-motion bobbin embroidery and quilting.

Challah Cover

Batik and commercial cotton fabrics; cotton, rayon and metallic threads; cotton batting and backing; machine piecing and free-motion bobbin embroidery and quilting.

Mezuzah

Hand-dyed, batik and commercial cotton fabrics; hand-dyed cotton and metallic threads; cotton batting and backing; sanded wood, glass beads, glass tube, silk ribbon; appliqué, free-motion bobbin embroidery and quilting.

Pomegranate Tallit, Kippah and Bag

The motif for this tallit is based on the Rosh Hashanah prayer, “May it be Your will, O G-d, that our good deeds will increase like the seeds of the pomegranate.” Hand-dyed and commercial silk fabrics, Chinese silk brocade; hand-dyed cotton, metallic, rayon and nylon threads; machine appliqué, free-motion bobbin embroidery. 2004 $500.00 AWARD: Fiber Art Study Group Award at Creative Crafts Council 25th Bienniel Show, 2005.

Geometric Tallit, Kippah, and Bag

“May my mind be clear, my spirit open, as I envelop myself in prayer.” Blessing by Marcia Falk. Hand-dyed and commercial silk fabrics; hand-dyed cotton and rayon threads; machine appliqué, free-motion bobbin embroidery.

My Tallit and Bag

“She finds linen and flax and puts her hands to them with a will.” Proverbs 31:13 Hand-dyed and commercial silk and cotton batik fabrics; hand-dyed silk and cotton threads; polyester batting; appliqué, free-motion bobbin embroidery and quilting.

Shirley Waxman, artist and mentor extraordinaire, introduced me to the joy of tallit making. This tallit, I made for myself, and wore for the first time when I became an adult bat mitzvah in 2004. The Hebrew names of my four children are embroidered on the four corners, and I thought the biblical quotation on the atarah, or collar, was especially appropriate for me. The knots, or tzitzit, of a tallit are tied in a special sequence to represent the 613 commandments, or mitvot, that a Jew must try to keep. The bag is embroidered with the letters of my Hebrew names, Judith and Sharon—Judith for “Jew” and Sharon for my mother, and the plains of the Midwest, where I grew up.

Matzo Ball Soup

Hand-dyed, over-dyed and painted; computer printed; and commercial cotton fabrics; cotton and nylon monofilament threads; jade and glass beads. Machine pieced, free-motion embroidered, appliquéd, and quilted; hand appliquéd and beaded. 2004. AWARD: Nimble Fingers Quilt Guild “Food and Fiber” Challenge.

The Women Danced

Wallhanging to recognize the adult b’not mitzvah class, “Chochma Nashim—Wise Women.” The design for Miriam is inspired by a “Tree of Life” greeting card, made by Hallmark©. Hand-dyed, batik, metallic and commercial cotton fabrics; cotton, metallic, nylon and rayon threads; cotton batting and backing; glass beads; machine piecing and free-motion quilting.

Mizrah

Batik, imported Indonesian hand-blocked and commercial cotton fabrics; hand-dyed cotton threads; machine piecing and free-motion bobbin embroidery and quilting. The design for this quilt comes from Ricky Tims’ book, Convergence Quilts.

Mizrah

Batik, imported Indonesian hand-blocked and commercial cotton fabrics; hand-dyed cotton threads; machine piecing and free-motion bobbin embroidery and quilting. The design for this quilt comes from Ricky Tims’ book, Convergence Quilts.

Mizrah

Hand-dyed, batik and commercial cotton fabrics; cotton and rayon perle threads; machine piecing and free-motion bobbin embroidery and quilting. The design for this quilt comes from Ricky Tims’ book, Convergence Quilts. A mizrah is hung on the eastern wall of the home so that one knows the direction of Jerusalem.

Return to Zion

Hand-dyed, batik, and commercial cotton and silk fabrics; cotton, rayon and nylon threads; silk ribbon; glass, metal and stone beads. Machine pieced, free-motion embroidered, appliquéd, and quilted; hand embellished and beaded. 2004. AWARDS: G Street Fabrics 2004 Quilt Challenge. Selected to tour with the Quilts, Inc. exhibit, “Tactile Architecture,” 2006 to 2007.

Chuppah

Ceremonial canopy for Jewish weddings. Hand-dyed silk, cotton and polyester threads, cotton batting and backing.

Pomegranate Mezuzah

Silk and cotton fabrics, silk and cotton threads, fibers, Swarovski crystals, and glass beads, glass tube, and parchment scroll. Machine pieced and embroidered; hand embellished.  Exhibited at Creative Crafts Council 25th Bienniel Show, 2005.

Mezuzah

Machine quilted, hand pieced and embellished of silk and cotton fabrics, silk and cotton threads, silk cocoons, fibers, peridot, Swarovski crystals, and glass beads, glass tube, and parchment scroll.  Exhibited at Creative Crafts Council 25th Bienniel Show, 2005.

Eili, Eili 1

“My God, My God, I pray that these things never end: The sand and the sea, the rush of the waters, the crash of the heavens, the prayer of the heart.” Traditional Israeli song attributed to Hannah Senesh. Hand-dyed and commercial cotton fabrics; cotton, metallic, rayon, and nylon threads; cotton batting and backing; fusible appliqué, free-motion bobbin embroidery and quilting.  Collection of Temple Emanuel, Kensington, Maryland.

Teal and Brown Tallit , Bag, and Kippah

“May my mind be clear, my spirit open, as I envelop myself in prayer.” Blessing by Marcia Falk. Hand-dyed and commercial silk fabrics; hand-dyed cotton and rayon threads; machine appliqué, free-motion bobbin embroidery.

Commissioned Tallitot

The creation of a tallit, or prayer shawl, for a particular person is a collaborative effort between the artist and the person for whom it is made. Adults who use the tallit to enhance their religious observance, and bar and bat mitzvah students who are preparing to read from the torah for the first time, all enjoy the process of creating a personal and unique tallit. This process includes collaborating on the selection of colors and fabrics, choosing meaningful wording for the atarah, or collar, helping to design a pattern or motif for the stripes, and learning to tie one’s own tzitzit, or fringes, in the traditional sequence of knots. These are samples of some of the commissioned tallitot I have made. Please contact me to discuss creating your own tallit.

Hold Fast

“It is a tree of life to those who hold fast to it.” Hand-dyed and commercial cotton and silk fabrics; cotton, rayon, and metallic threads; cotton batting. Machine piecing and appliqué; hand-guided free-motion machine quilting.

Tree of Life Chuppah

Hand-guided machine piecing, appliqué, Embroidery, “Thread Sketching” © and quilting using hand-dyed and commercial cotton and silk fabrics; polyester batting; cotton, rayon, polyester, and metallic threads.

Memorial Mezuzah

Hand-dyed and commercial cotton and silk fabrics; cotton, metallic, and rayon threads; found wood; free-motion bobbin embroidery and quilting; hand beading. 2009 Collection of Bet Aviv Synagogue in Columbia, Maryland. Commissioned to honor the memory of a temple member. The beads used were from her collection.

Family Trees Chuppah

Hand-painted silk habotai; bordered with silk dupioni. Several generations of family members’ names were inscribed onto the tree trunks and leaves.

Tifereth Israel Congregation Bimah, Washington, DC

Hand-dyed and commercial cotton and silk fabrics; upholstery velvet; cotton and rayon threads; raw-edge appliqué; machine pieced; free-motion machine quilted. The Interior Parochet, or curtain, hanging on the inside back wall of the ark, is quilted with the names of the congregants who helped to fund the project. The entire commission included the interior parochet; the simple, sheer exterior parochet; six torah mantles; two small lectern covers; and the torah reading table cover. The inspiration for the colors selection came from Exodus 26:31: “You shall make a curtain of blue, purple and scarlet yarn and finely twisted linen.” The torah mantles are adorned with appliquéd pomegranates and quilted with the images of bells and pomegranate flowers, to represent the instructions from Exodus 28:33: “You shall make on its hem pomegranates of blue and purple and scarlet material, all around on its hem, and bells of gold between them all around.” The project took over two years to complete.

Rabbi Tessler 25th Anniversary Quilt

Hand-dyed and commercial cotton and silk fabrics; cotton, metallic and rayon threads; found tree branch; raw-edge appliqué; machine pieced; free-motion machine quilted. This project commemorated the 25th anniversary of the rabbi of Beth Sholom Congregation, Potomac, Maryland The quilt includes numerous references to Rabbi Tessler and his belief in the importance of community. Thematically, the lower copper-colored plane represents the ancient temple altar, with embroidered and appliquéd images of the temple shulchan, or table, arc, and menorah. The upper pale blue plane represents the transformation of those ancient items into the tangible, modern-day equivalents: the Shabbat table, challah seder, Kiddush cups, and candlesticks. The twelve tribes are depicted in the tents along the left and bottom. The words from Exodus 25: 8, “And let them make Me a sanctuary that I may dwell among them,” is appliquéd and embroidered along the right and bottom. The Hebrew letters morphs into cherubim on the heavenly ladder, an allusion to the rabbi’s Hebrew name, Jacob. Mordechai, the rabbi’s other Hebrew name, is represented by the white horse. The names of the rabbi, his wife, and their two children are written on the open pages of the seder. Each of over 100 leaves were separately stitched, turned, quilted, and attached to the top of the piece. Members of the rabbi’s family participated in attaching some of them. Characters amongst the tents hold musical instruments and Israeli fruit, representing the family’s love of music, the joy and abundance of the Jewish people, and the connection to the land of Israel. The project took a year to complete.

Rabbi Stone’s Tallit

The body of this tallit was made from a shawl handwoven by victims of land mines in Cambodia. Textile artist, Carol Cassidy, designs the scarves and shawls and trains the staff of mostly women to weave these stunning works of art. I added the atarah and tzitzit to transform it into a tallit. Please check out her work at www.laotextiles.com

Vintage Embroidery Chuppah

The center of this chuppah is a vintage embroidered cloth from the groom’s grandmother.

Tallit Chuppah

The groom commissioned a tallit that the couple used first as the centerpiece of their chuppah.

Menorah Mat

Silk, cotton, beads, buttons, charms. Machine pieced and quilted; hand-embellished and painted.

Fabric Gelt Gift Tag

Cotton, silk, and metallic fabrics. Beads, buttons, and charms. Machine embroidered; hand embellished.

Get instructions for making fabric gelt and more gift tag ideas in the 2011-2012 edition of Quilting Arts GIFTS.

Gelt Bag

Silk and cotton fabrics; beads, buttons, charms. Machine embroidered, pieced, and quilted. Fabric painting.

Vintage Textile Tallit

The design incorporates curtains and lace trim from a bat mitzvah’s grandmother.

Temple Wall Chuppah

Hand-guided machine piecing, appliqué, Embroidery, “Thread Sketching” and quilting using hand-dyed and commercial cotton and silk fabrics; polyester batting; cotton, rayon, polyester, and metallic threads.

Fabric Gelt Fascinator Headband

My youngest daughter modeling a fascinator headband with fabric gelt. Download instructions at http://www.quiltingdaily.com/media/p/30997.aspx